Low-Impact #AerobicExercise

From Spine-Health: Read More on their sitedreamstime_xl_52110136

“Along with specific back exercises, aerobic exercise that increases the heart rate for a sustained period is very beneficial for helping back problems. Aerobic exercise increases the flow of blood and nutrients to back structures which supports healing, and can decrease the stiffness in the back and joints that lead to back pain. While many patients with back pain are able to participate in vigorous exercise like running or step aerobics, others find it easier to engage in low-impact exercise, which does not jar the spine.”

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Quick Tip More Doctors Recommending Exercise

“Nearly 33 percent of adults who saw a doctor in the previous year said they were told to exercise. That was up from about 23 percent in 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported.” According to fox news today. This is good new since all chiropractors know that motion leads to health and happiness.

Some important rules for new exercise programs. Start slow don’t over do it, this is the quickest way to kill a workout routine.  You should walk 5 minutes the first day not 1 hour and build to it slowly over 2-3 weeks, or use light weights to start. Find a routine that excites you or a workout partner who can keep you focused. Consider core strengthening and cardiovascular as the most important activities followed by flexibility. Finally read our blog on exercise mistakes.

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By: Paul R. Mahler DC
mahler-chiropractic.com
may be reproduced in whole only

Understanding Golf Injuries and How to Prevent Them

Golf is a sport that is prone to injury. No mater how long you have been involved in the sport the more likely it is that you will injure yourself. It is most likely reason for injuring your self  is inappropriately swing the golf club. Professional golfers commonly injure the wrist, followed by the back, hand, shoulder, and knee. Amateur golfers most commonly injuries the lower back, followed by the elbow, wrist, shoulder, and knee. It is obvious that you can be injured even in non-contact sports such as golf, swimming, and track. If you under stand the golf swing you can avoid or correct these injuries but if they are persistent some sort of physical medicine may help.

Let’s analyze the golf swing. There are three phases to the golf swing, and each can cause injury if executed incorrectly. There are also specific exercises you can perform to help reduce your risk of hurting yourself during that particular swing phase.

Phase 1: Take-Away. The take-away consists of the back swing. Thumb and wrist injuries are most common during this phase particularly on the lead hand. Here is an effective workout for the muscles of the wrist, hand and forearm. To begin, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart holding a 5-pound dumbbell in your right hand. Keeping your arm to your side and using only your wrist, raise the dumbbell as high as you can and lower it as far as you can. Do two sets of 25 reps. Next, do another two sets of 25 reps, but while moving your wrist from side to side as far as you can. Repeat this entire workout with the dumbbell in your left hand. An advanced workout for your wrists would be to take a barbell/dumbbells with a weight you can handle, anywhere from 10-45 pounds, and do three exercises (known as a “tri-set”) back to back to back without rest. Start with your feet shoulder width apart and grab the weight with your hands facing down, shoulder-width apart, held which each thumb. Reverse curl the weight up toward your body, flexing the forearm as you finish the movement at the top. Do 10 reps. Next, hold the weight behind you, palms facing up and even with your gluteus maximus (your buttocks). The back of your hand should be touching the top of your buttocks. Raise the weight as high as you can without moving your arms; use your wrist only for 10 reps. Finally, sit down on the bench and rest your forearms on your thighs. Do not allow your wrists to rest on your knees. Hold the weight with your palms up and move only your wrist vertically for 10 reps. Do not rest and perform another tri-set, but this time do 12 reps, and then finish the last set with 15 reps. Another option is to pyramid: increase the amount of weight while decreasing the number of repetitions. For example: 10 pounds for 15 reps, 12 pounds for 12 reps, and 15 pounds for 10 reps. There is an inverse relationship at play here: As you add more weight, you do less reps.

Phase 2: Impact. The next phase of the swing consists of the downswing and impact with the ball. The most common injuries during this phase knee particularly the back of the knee and compression forces acting on both wrists. Also, the lead elbow and hand/wrist are often hurt during impact. In terms of exercises that can help prevent these injuries, leg extensions/leg curls and abduction/adduction exercises. Many fitness clubs have equipment for these types of exercises. These exercises along with regular stretching and massage, are extremely effective for the legs. Triceps push-downs using a reverse grip with the hands up is an excellent exercise for the triceps and will help to prevent injury to the elbows. High-intensity training (one set to muscle exhaustion for each exercise, using slow, deliberate movements) works well and is a safe method of training for all the exercises above. For the legs, do 15-20 reps; for the triceps/elbows, do 8-12 reps.

Phase 3: Follow-Through. This is the phase after impact where the golfer finishes his swing. From a chiropractic stand point this can be the most damaging phase for your spine because it involves abnormal torque on the low back. This phase requires training the oblique muscles. Using a trunk rotation machine, at your local gym, twist slowly in a circular fashion for 20-25 reps, and also use lower back extension machine for 15-20 reps. Keep the weight light and the reps high for this exercises and make sure to do them slowly and eliminate momentum. Strengthen the core muscles with these exercises will help prevent back injuries. This means that a routine of exercises for the back will help your game and while you are at it don’t forget back stretching as well.

Stretching and massage can also help prevent injury but always warm up before stretching to bring blood area. You should warm up before a round of golf, take a brisk walk or get a quick massage that includes techniques and stretches to increase range of motion. The right way to stretch is important. Begin with three sets of 10-15 deep knee bends and then walk a quarter of a mile. Next, perform a series of stretches. Reciprocal inhibition stretches, performed by stretching to a level at which your body innately says stop, is effective for increasing range of motion without over-stretching and injuring yourself. When you reach the point at which your body says stop, contract the opposite muscle and hold the contraction for several seconds; then release. There should be an increase in of range of motion Now hold the new position for at least 30 seconds, then move on to your next stretch.

Some good stretches are toe-touch stretches and side stretches. When doing the toe-touch stretch, you must keep a flat back. Do not round your back. When you drop down into the stretch, contract your gluteus maximus and hold the contraction for 6-7 seconds, then breathe and release and you will find yourself falling deeper into the stretch. You must remember not to hold your breath even during an Isometric contraction and always feel your breath releasing in and out of your nose. You should also breathe deeply through your diaphragm. The toe-touch stretch will increase flexibility in the hamstrings. Place one arm over you head and bend to the side to do the side stretch. Do this stretch in increments as follows. Go as far as possible without pulling the muscle, then contract the gluteus maximus muscle for several seconds; then release and drop into the stretch, holding for 30 seconds. Repeat 2-3 times on each side.

Cooling down after playing is imperative to do some simple breathing and stretching exercises after golfing. Lie flat on your back and tuck your knees to your chest and breathe; hold for 30 seconds. Extend your arm in the supine position [palm up], grab your finger tips and pull your hand down; again, hold for 30 seconds. Next, extend your arm in the prone position (palm down) and grab your fingertips and pull toward you from the bottom position. Hold for 30 seconds. These simple exercises are essential to injury prevention following each round of golf, practice session, etc.

Injuries can happen at any time in any sport, but following these suggestions can certainly help you avoid severe and permanent injuries whenever you’re golfing.

Why are so many golfers are injured every year? 27 million injuries annually, according to some estimates. The average golfer has no warm-up or stretching protocols for golf then they are swinging the club with violent, intermittent effort. This is a recipe for injury and in addition the average golfer uses the “grip it and rip it” golf swings. On top of this many golfers have varied amounts of pre-existing postural dysfunction and poor flexibility. When you add it all up, this is a recipe for injury. Many of these golfers are suffering from repetitive strain injuries due to lack of flexibility, postural instability and poor swing mechanics.

Isn’t it time to repair your golf swing. Contact Mahler family Chiropractic Center and we will help get your golf game back into the swing of things.

By: Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC
Mahler Family Chiropractic Center
1144 wyoming Ave.
Kingston, PA. 18704
http://mahler-chiropractic.com
May be reproduced in whole only.
We can treat golf injuries and pain  including neck pain, back pain, rotator cuff, foot pain, carpal tunnel, and much more.

Injuries and Sports

Other Posts: Golf; Shoulder Streching; Swimming; Exercises

What to do when you have a sports injuryChiropractic plays a larger role in the health and performance of many athletes. Today, coaches and colleges as well as a number of Olympians include chiropractic care as part of their training regiment. Chiropractors are considered part of the team. Chiropractic care is over 100 years and plays an important part in swimming and other sports.

All athletes, at one point or another, have suffered some kind of an injury, ranging from  a muscle pull, a sprain/strain injury, a repetitive stress injury or a major trauma. Sports and injury go hand in hand! So what can be done to treat sports injuries and what is the most appropriate type of care for treating these types of injuries? Most people who suffer sports related injuries try an over the counter medication (such as Tylenol, Motrin or Aleve). when that doesn’t work then they’ll go to their family doctor for something stronger. Unfortunately drugs only temporarily mask the symptoms, they do not cure sports related injuries. Instead consider a physical medicine approach, such as chiropractic care, to treating sports injuries. Physical medicine includes chiropractic adjustments coupled with a rehabilitation program (physical therapy) which is designed to improve functional range of motion, stabilize and strengthen the supportive soft tissues, foster balance and coordination and of course to get you out of pain as quickly as possible. Many professional athletes and 85% of all Olympic athletes rely on chiropractic care to enhance performance and to help them heal from injuries. The world’s best athletes, such as Tiger Woods, Emmitt Smith, Joe Montana, (decathlon gold medal winner) Dan O’Brien, Evander Holyfield, Lance Armstrong, etc.., have all used chiropractic care and it works for them.

A chiropractor can treat knee injuries, pack, injuries, rotator cuff injury, ankle injuries, and much more. Isn’t it time you consider chiropractic care, it will work for you too!

By: Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC
Mahler Family Chiropractic Center
1144 wyoming Ave.
Kingston, PA. 18704
http://mahler-chiropractic.com
May be reproduced in whole only.
We can treat sports injuries and pain  including neck pain, back pain, rotator cuff, foot pain, carpal tunnel, and much more.

The Physiology of Pain

 

The physiology of pain can often be complicated. The bottom line is that pain is chiropractors can help with fibromyalgiaall in your head and is also based on your life experiences. Pain is also the bodies last warning system that something is wrong and often comes after months or even years of dysfunction.

So what is pain? Pain is the brains interpretation of the nerve signals being sent from the injured region of the body. There are several factors on how pain is perceived by an individual. One of the most important factors is life experience what is the worst pain ever to a child will often not phase an adult who has lived through several traumatic events. Second is the emotional state of the patient. Yes I did say the emotional state, people who are depressed or have other normal physiological factors may ether magnify painful symptoms or ignore them all together. Finally the quality of the signal is an important factor if the signal for pain that the brain must interpret is reduced or amplified by forces on the nerves themselves (chiropractic subluxations being one type), it is like using a dimmer switch on a light and the intensity of the pain may change. This is often seen when there is disc involvement or in sciatica.

As well as these three main factors on the quality of pain there are several factor that effect the location of the sensation of pain. Again location can be effected by interference with the nerve and how it transmits the signal. If there is pain in the right leg it may not be the right leg at all. In some instances pressure may be placed on the nerve as it exits the spine or even in the spine, but since the brain thinks this nerve ends at the foot it thinks you have foot pain. This is the same mechanism that causes phantom leg syndrome in amputees.

To further complicate the situation there are disease that excite the nervous system and produce the symptoms of pain in areas that may have no injury at all. Some of these conditions are fibromyalgia and RSD. Finely there is the double crush syndrome. This is often seen in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS), and is when pressure is put on the nerve in two or more locations. In the case of CTS this is often the neck and wrist with some shoulder involvement. What happens is when the wrist puts pressure on the nerve there may be no symptoms but when the neck and wrist or shoulder and wrist or all three act up the hands go numb or become very painful to the point of being debilitating.

All of these factors make managing pain difficult in some case. If your pain doesn’t resolve in a reasonable amount of time you may have one or more of these factors. In these case it takes a professional with many years of experience to help track down the cause and place you on the road to recovery.

At Mahler Family Chiropractic Center we have over 10 years of experience helping people with these problems.

By: Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC

www.mahler-chiropractic.com

This article may be reproduced in its entirety only.

We treat pain and  in some cases it can be cured neck pain, back pain, shoulder pain, rotator cuff pain, and more.

The anatomy of Tendinitis

Knee Pain and Arthritis

 

In this post you will find a description of tendinitis (informally also tendonitis) its causes and contributing factors. Simply put tendinitis is an inflammation of a tendon. It occurs when there is an injury, a tear, of the tendon or over use which involves micro tearing of the tendon.

The healing time of these injuries varies based on several factors. The first factor is time of injury. This is due to the fact that the longer there has been a tear or micro tearing the more scare tissue that forms. Age is another major factor. Once the growth plates close, this occurs in the early twenties and depends on gender and genetics, the blood supply is removed from tendons and ligaments in the body. This lack of blood supply means that the tendons rely on moment to provide nutrients for healing and the removal of toxins. This fact leads to the injury taking a minimum of 3 to 6 months to heal. The final major factor is re-injury and if you are still using the injured area this will increase healing time to as much as 2 to 3 years.

In the chiropractic office there are several ways that these injuries are healed. First the inflammation is reduced using a combination of ice and cold laser. Second chiropractic adjustments are used to remove pressure from the affected joints and to support the patient through the healing process, as well as to maximise range of motion during healing and recovery phases. Finally during the healing phase a combination of stretching and strengthening exercises are used to help decrease the chance of re-injury.

Now you have a greater understanding of tendinitis its causes and how to manage it.

For information on how this may affect your golf game  or other sports visit our web site Mahler Family Chiropractic Center

By: Paul R Mahler Jr. DC

www.mahler-chiropractic.com

Article may only be reproduced in full.

We treat tendinitis (informally also tendonitis) in some cases it can be cured

Swimming and Chiropractic

I have been involved with swimming for over 30 years as both a swimmer and coach. It has been my experience over the years that the repetitive injures common to swimming respond very favourably to traditional chiropractic care and I only wish I had known of the benefits of chiropractic care 30 years ago.

According to Dr. Jack Barnathan, a chiropractor from New York “injuries can build up and cause nerve pressure-in other words, pain. Chiropractors are trained in treating such problems.”

Barnathan has worked with athletes worldwide, including super swimmer Dara Torres, who used chiropractic for her back, hips and shoulders before resuming training for the Olympics in 2000. In the pool, she found that chiropractic provided great relief for her body-post-workouts and prior to competition.

According to Torres, “when you need a quick fix and don’t have time to rehab something, I always found quick relief from chiropractors,”.

Olympic head coach Richard Quick began using chiropractic resources at the University of Texas in the 1980s.

“Chiropractic is playing a larger and larger role in all forms of athletics. It’s an issue of figuring out what works and helps athletic performance, and making it a part of your program,” he says.

It is often overuse syndromes that plague swimmers and this often difficult to mange the injuries and maintain a high level of conditioning. This is why the chiropractic model works so well for swimmers and other athletes, while rest may be initially needed I have found that it is best to incorporate parts of the activity that is being preformed in the treatment itself. This philosophy lends itself to continued although often modified training and results in minimal loss of conditioning allowing the athlete to perform at peke levels sooner and shortening healing time.

For swimmers it is often strained back muscles or shoulder injuries and it is important to strengthen and support these injuries through intensive training. But it is even more important to avoid injuries that can be accomplished through a good warm-up and stretching routine. Please see our page on shoulder stretching.

Citations:

Swimming World and Junior Swimmer Aug 2003Swimming World and Junior Swimmer, Stott, Michael J

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I have been involved with swimming for over 30 years as both a swimmer and coach. It has been my experience over the years that the repetitive injures common to swimming respond very favourably to traditional chiropractic care and I only wish I had known of the benefits of chiropractic care 30 years ago.

Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC