Sharks in the Great Barrier Reef

Guest Post: How to avoid shark attacks in the Whitsunday Islands among the types of different sharks seen at the waters around Airlie Beach is the shovel nose shark named for the natural shovel shape of its upper body. But there are many other recorded sightings of the bull nose to tiger and a number of reef sharks. It is possible the great white shark, the most dangerous shark to humans, may pass by in the deeper waters past the continental shelf, but is more often seen from the Sunshine coast and further south as it prefers the colder waters.

Varieties of Sharks in the waters around Airlie Beach

So, how many different species of sharks swim in the Whitsuday Islands? The quantities are unclear, although there are obviously more than a dozen from the bottom feeding cat shark to the larger and more dangerous tiger shark. The following list names some of the more commonly seen sharks varieties living in the area:

  • White Tip Reef Shark
  • Grey Reef Shark
  • Oceanic Silver-tip shark
  • Hammerhead Shark
  • Shovel Nosed Shark
  • Bull Shark
  • Cat Shark
  • Tiger Shark
  • Reef Sharks

The white tip reef shark; with its slender body and short, wide head, only measures in at an average of 5 feet 2 inches. It swims close to the floor of the ocean in clear waters, making the Great Barrier Reef an ideal environment for the Reef Shark. The shark is well known for its nightly hunt after sleeping in caves during the day. It would be a rare experience for the white tip reef shark to instigate an assault on man. The only natural difference on the Black Tip Reef Shark is the black tip of the fin as compared to the white tip. The black tip reef sharks stays in shallow waters and is considerably smaller than the white tip. Sharks in the waters around Airlie Beach Dangerous to Humans All sharks are obvious predators staying beneath the surface hunting for the next prey but there are not many dangerous species. There are a few that, because of their size, power and massive jaws that a diver needs to be aware of such as the tiger, bull, bronze whaler, mako and hammerhead sharks. Attacks on us are very rare in the waters around Airlie Beach. It is said the tiger shark is the most dangerous but it is a night feeder and heads to deeper waters during the day.

There are places along the coast providing dive tours for anyone that would like to see the waters around Airlie Beach. Some tours are especially aimed at spotting one of the sharks of the Great Barrier Reef. At the Whitsuday Islands going with an skilled tour operator reduces the risks of being in the water and increases the chances of seeing some magnificient tropical fish, live coral and sharks.

The Dangerous Creatures series and this article about sharks of the Great Barrier Reef Series has been put together by Toscana Village Resort, Airlie Beach Accommodation.

This information was provided by seolinkvine.com and the copyright is owned by the original owner.

Every now and then I see interests me other then health information. I was a Marine Biology major in undergrad and a dive instructor in an earlier part of my life and love everything water and marine related just thought this post was cool.  At Mahler Family Chiropractic Center we love to bring you useful information. This post has been approved by Dr. Mahler.

If you have a shark story post it below

Shoulder Exercises

Six great exercises to rehabilitate, strengthen, and prevent injury of the shoulders.

1: Scapular Retraction: For this exercise, you will need elastic exercise material, such as Thera-band.

  • Put the band around a solid object, at about waist level. Each hand should hold an end of the band.
  • With your elbows at your sides and bent to 90 degrees, pull the band back to move your shoulder blades toward each other. It should feel like you are trying to hold a pencil between your shoulder blades.
  • Return to the starting position.
  • Repeat 8 to 12 times. and up to 3 sets

As you improve and If you have good range of motion in your shoulders, try this exercise with your arms lifted out to the sides, with your elbows at a 90-degree angle. Raise the elastic band up to about shoulder level. Pull the band back to move your shoulder blades toward each other. Return to the starting position

2: Shoulder External Rotation

  • Attach elastic to secure object at waist level.
  • Place a rolled up towel between elbow and body.
  • Grasp elastic in hand, elbow bent to 90 degrees.
  • Rotate arm outward and return.
  • Slowly return to start position and repeat.
  • Do 8-12 reps and up to 3 sets. Do both shoulders see guidelines below.

3: Shoulder Internal Rotation

  • Secure elastic at waist level.
  • Place a rolled up towel between elbow and body.
  • Sit or stand with involved side to elastic,
  • Grasp elastic and pull hand inward, across body, as shown.
  • Slowly return to start position and repeat.
  • Do 8-12 reps and up to 3 sets. Do both shoulders see guidelines below.

4: Shoulder Flexion

  • Stand on elastic.
  • Begin with arm at side, elbow straight, thumb up.
  • Grasp elastic.
  • Raise arm in front over head, keeping elbow straight.
  • Slowly return to starting position.
  • Do 8-12 reps and up to 3 sets. Do both shoulders see guidelines below.

5: Shoulder Extension

  • Secure elastic at waist level as shown.
  • Grasp elastic and pull arm backwards keeping elbow straight.
  • Slowly return to start position.
  • Do 8-12 reps and up to 3 sets. Do both shoulders see guidelines below.

6: Stability Ball Push Up Technique

  • In the first week place the stability ball on a wall about the level of your chest with feet out from the wall.
  • As you improve work you way to the floor this is harder than it sounds be careful.
  • Lay with your chest on the stability ball
  • Place your hands at the sides of your chest.
  • Place your toes on the floor, legs straight.
  • Push your body up until your arms are almost straight (do not lock your elbows).
  • Hold and balance for two seconds.
  • Slowly return to the starting position and repeat.
  • Do 8-12 reps and up to 3 sets.

It is important to remember that for is the most important thing wen performing these exercises not the amount of weight or repetitions, so start slow and work into the shoulder exercise over several weeks. It is also important to work both shoulders evenly don’t neglect the good shoulder but keep it light with the good shoulder until the injured one caches up. It is important to maintain balance at all time you don’t want to injury the good shoulder so if you can only do 8 reps on the injured side do 8 with the good side.

Start with exercise 1,2, and 3 on week one, In week 2 to 4 add exercises 4 and 5. and after 1 to 2 months add exercise 6. The rate at which you add these exercises depends on how you feel don’t over do it but keep moving forward. This is a routine that should be performed 2-4 times a week for the rest of your life. It will help you avoid future injuries as well and can be used to prevent rotator cuff injuries. The bad shoulder will catch up don’t worry and good luck.

By: Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC
Mahler Family Chiropractic Center
1144 wyoming Ave.
Kingston, PA. 18704
http://mahler-chiropractic.com
May be reproduced in whole only.
We can treat shoulder injuries including rotator cuff.

Injuries and Sports

Other Posts: Golf; Shoulder Streching; Swimming; Exercises

What to do when you have a sports injuryChiropractic plays a larger role in the health and performance of many athletes. Today, coaches and colleges as well as a number of Olympians include chiropractic care as part of their training regiment. Chiropractors are considered part of the team. Chiropractic care is over 100 years and plays an important part in swimming and other sports.

All athletes, at one point or another, have suffered some kind of an injury, ranging from  a muscle pull, a sprain/strain injury, a repetitive stress injury or a major trauma. Sports and injury go hand in hand! So what can be done to treat sports injuries and what is the most appropriate type of care for treating these types of injuries? Most people who suffer sports related injuries try an over the counter medication (such as Tylenol, Motrin or Aleve). when that doesn’t work then they’ll go to their family doctor for something stronger. Unfortunately drugs only temporarily mask the symptoms, they do not cure sports related injuries. Instead consider a physical medicine approach, such as chiropractic care, to treating sports injuries. Physical medicine includes chiropractic adjustments coupled with a rehabilitation program (physical therapy) which is designed to improve functional range of motion, stabilize and strengthen the supportive soft tissues, foster balance and coordination and of course to get you out of pain as quickly as possible. Many professional athletes and 85% of all Olympic athletes rely on chiropractic care to enhance performance and to help them heal from injuries. The world’s best athletes, such as Tiger Woods, Emmitt Smith, Joe Montana, (decathlon gold medal winner) Dan O’Brien, Evander Holyfield, Lance Armstrong, etc.., have all used chiropractic care and it works for them.

A chiropractor can treat knee injuries, pack, injuries, rotator cuff injury, ankle injuries, and much more. Isn’t it time you consider chiropractic care, it will work for you too!

By: Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC
Mahler Family Chiropractic Center
1144 wyoming Ave.
Kingston, PA. 18704
http://mahler-chiropractic.com
May be reproduced in whole only.
We can treat sports injuries and pain  including neck pain, back pain, rotator cuff, foot pain, carpal tunnel, and much more.

Shoulder Stretching Routine

Avoiding a rotator cuff injury

Front of the Shoulder Stretch: Pector Elongator

Shoulder stretching

Shoulder stretching

Maintaining open, fluid movement in the front of the shoulder during swimming will decrease compression in the joint. With biking and running, the shoulder tends to rotate inward and lift up toward the ear.

This same movement in swimming will add to tension and compression in the neck and shoulder. The pector elongator is a great stretch to use before or after a workout.

  1. Stand with your right hip about two or three feet away from a wall.
  2. Place your right hand on the wall at shoulder level, behind the torso. Keep your elbow loosely bent.
  3. Now rotate your elbow forward and maintain this forward rotation throughout the stretch.
  4. Twist your upper torso to the left, while retaining elbow rotation, to create a stretch in the front of the right shoulder.
  5. Hold the stretch for five to 12 breaths.
  6. Switch arms and repeat.

Variations can be created by moving your hand up and down the wall or by stepping farther away from the wall. Pector elongator is intense, so go easy. When you start to feel the stretch, stop and inhale deeply into the area being stretched.

Also, using a doorway will give you a perfect stretch at home or at the office. The hard part of this stretch is continuing to maintain a forward rotation of the elbow.

Deltoid/Rotator Cuff Stretch

Every shoulder problem seems to have rotator cuff involvement. These muscles are unique because they function as a ligament at the joint, and a muscle in locomotion. Located above the rotators are the deltoids, which can be stretched along with the rotators.

When an athlete has any type of shoulder problem, this is the first stretch I introduce. It’s ideal because it takes care of the muscle, the joint capsule and the range of motion.

  1. Stand facing the wall, approximately a foot away.
  2. Draw your right arm across your body.
  3. Place the back of your right hand on the wall at shoulder level.
  4. Move your left shoulder toward your right hand as far as you can, then lean the right shoulder toward the wall.
  5. To create a slightly different stretch, place the front of your hand on the wall.
  6. Hold the stretch for five to 12 breaths.
  7. Switch arms and repeat.

There’s room to be creative with this stretch. You can walk the hips away from the wall or experiment with your hand in different locations. To intensify the stretch, use the floor instead of the wall. The key is to move the shoulder that’s not being stretched down, and slowly lean the involved shoulder into the wall, floor or couch. (see step 4).

Side of the Torso Stretch: Lateral Bend

The side (lateral) muscles of the torso have a great deal of strength, power, endurance and elasticity. This natural elasticity adds power without increased mass. This stretch will allow you to be more effective in the reaching part of your swim stroke and have more power on the recovery part.

  1. Stand with your feet hip-distance apart, knees slightly bent.
  2. Expand your chest, lift your ribs and raise both hands over your head.
  3. On exhale, pull your abdomen back and lean to the right.
  4. Hold this position and inhale into the ribs.
  5. As you exhale, pull abdomen back and lean to the left, hold, inhale into the ribs.
  6. Repeat this side-to-side motion to the right and left four to six times.

Move from one side to the other on an exhale, allowing for a deep inhale into the ribs. This will increase both extension and strength. Keep the chest slightly in front of the hips and rotate the top of the pelvic girdle back—this will elongate the lower-back muscles and stretch the lats.

Lateral bend is a great stretch to use after a hard workout because of its effect on the lower back.

To concentrate the effects of flexibility training, your breath should be long and smooth, and your mind should be focused on the area you want to effect. Easy, extended breathing like this will improve both performance and recovery. Race and train forever.

A proper stretching routine will help avoid pain in the shoulder and rotator cuff injuries.

By: Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC
Mahler Family Chiropractic Center
1144 wyoming Ave.
Kingston, PA. 18704
http://mahler-chiropractic.com
May be reproduced in whole only.
We can treat rotator cuff injuries and pain.

Swimming and Chiropractic

I have been involved with swimming for over 30 years as both a swimmer and coach. It has been my experience over the years that the repetitive injures common to swimming respond very favourably to traditional chiropractic care and I only wish I had known of the benefits of chiropractic care 30 years ago.

According to Dr. Jack Barnathan, a chiropractor from New York “injuries can build up and cause nerve pressure-in other words, pain. Chiropractors are trained in treating such problems.”

Barnathan has worked with athletes worldwide, including super swimmer Dara Torres, who used chiropractic for her back, hips and shoulders before resuming training for the Olympics in 2000. In the pool, she found that chiropractic provided great relief for her body-post-workouts and prior to competition.

According to Torres, “when you need a quick fix and don’t have time to rehab something, I always found quick relief from chiropractors,”.

Olympic head coach Richard Quick began using chiropractic resources at the University of Texas in the 1980s.

“Chiropractic is playing a larger and larger role in all forms of athletics. It’s an issue of figuring out what works and helps athletic performance, and making it a part of your program,” he says.

It is often overuse syndromes that plague swimmers and this often difficult to mange the injuries and maintain a high level of conditioning. This is why the chiropractic model works so well for swimmers and other athletes, while rest may be initially needed I have found that it is best to incorporate parts of the activity that is being preformed in the treatment itself. This philosophy lends itself to continued although often modified training and results in minimal loss of conditioning allowing the athlete to perform at peke levels sooner and shortening healing time.

For swimmers it is often strained back muscles or shoulder injuries and it is important to strengthen and support these injuries through intensive training. But it is even more important to avoid injuries that can be accomplished through a good warm-up and stretching routine. Please see our page on shoulder stretching.

Citations:

Swimming World and Junior Swimmer Aug 2003Swimming World and Junior Swimmer, Stott, Michael J

www.mahler-chiropractic.com

May be reproduced in full only

I have been involved with swimming for over 30 years as both a swimmer and coach. It has been my experience over the years that the repetitive injures common to swimming respond very favourably to traditional chiropractic care and I only wish I had known of the benefits of chiropractic care 30 years ago.

Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC