Water not Sports Drinks for Student Athletes!

ImageAccording to the Harvard health publication Harvard School of Medicine “Nicely timed for the 2012 Olympic Games in London, the British Medical Journal (BMJ) haspublished several articles revealing the “truth about sports drinks.” That truth is this: drink when you are thirsty and don’t waste your money or calories on sports drinks—choose water instead.” (http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/trade-sports-drinks-for-water-201207305079)

I have been preaching this for yeas a small amount of sports drinks early or several hours before a competition may be OK but let water and thirst dictate how you drink and hydrate. The body has know when and how to drink since we entered the earth. On top of that the drink of choice for thousands of years has been water. The real question is are sports drinks even safe. From that same article:

“There is no evidence that dehydration has ever killed a marathoner, Dr. Arthur Siegel, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a medical advisor to the Boston Marathon, told the BMJ. But the drumbeat that athletes must stay fully hydrated and drink before they become thirsty has spawned a new problem—overhydration. That’s what killed a healthy, 28-year-old woman during the 2002 Boston Marathon. She collapsed a few miles short of the finish line and died a day later. The cause of death was hyponatremia—too little sodium in her blood caused by drinking too much fluid before and during the marathon. According to the BMJ, 16 marathoners have died and more than 1,600 have become critically ill due to overhydration and hyponatremia.

Sports drinks don’t appear to prevent hyponatremia. A study of marathoners by Harvard-based researchers found that 13% had some degree of hyponatremia, and that it was just as likely to happen among those who guzzled sports drinks during the marathon as it was among those who stuck with water.”

So Drink water for enhanced performance and avoid the sports drinks as your main source of energy and hydration. If you need energy eat a piece of fruit and drink a glass of water to stay hydrated. This should provide all of the sugar and electrolytes you need along with fluids.

Are their exceptions sure. If you you are running the Boston or New York marathon and need both energy and fluids but the majority of you fluids should still be pure clean water augmented with sports drinks.

Paul R. Mahler DC

Mahler Family Chiropractic Center

mahler-chiropractic.com

Chiropractic Quick Tip: How Much Water Do You Really Need?

Why do we need water and how much do we need? In modern society we often think that tea, espresso, alcohol, pop, and other types of manufactured drinks are attractive substitutes for the daily pure natural water requirements of the body. This may be a harmful mistake. Water is the solvent in our bodies, and as a result, water is used in all activities performed by our bodies. Think for a minute of just a couple of the features that water regulates:

  • The activity of body
  • The transfer of nutritional elements in to our cells
  • The action of waste removal out of our cells
  • The flow of lymph fluid
  • The activity of nerve impulses through our nerves
  • The activity of hormones through the duration of our anatomies
  • The working of our minds

We are able to perform quite well and for extended periods of time without adequate water. Your body quickly adjusts and begins removing more water from your own feces for instance. Less water is flushed by the kidneys to limit water loss. There are several health authorities who declare that your system does very well on 2 glasses of any type of fluid each day; plus the water present in the meals you eat. But adaptation is confused by these authorities with health. Adaptation fundamentally leads to compromise, which leads to reduced health over time.

Eventually it might be proven that drinking over 2 glasses of water a day has no health advantages, but that day hasn’t arrived yet. Your kidneys expel 1-2 liters of water each day. When you breath the water vapor you expel needs to be replaced. (On a hot day, you are able to sweat out up to 8.5 quarts of water.) Consequently, until it’s actually confirmed you should drink between 8-16 glasses (8oz per glass) of pure water a day. Fruit and vegetable juices may be taken for a small amount and also limited amounts of non-diuretic herbal teas (without sugar). Some foods, such as vegetables have a lot of water but in general you should use mostly pure water.

The day will come when drinking 8 cups of water a day fails when we forsake what we’ve known for years and what commonsense tells us. A day may come when science shows that water, soda, and coffee are one and exactly the same. It is not today. So until then please drink a minimum of 8 glasses of pure water a day.

By Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC

mahler-chiropractic.com