Injuries and Sports

Other Posts: Golf; Shoulder Streching; Swimming; Exercises

What to do when you have a sports injuryChiropractic plays a larger role in the health and performance of many athletes. Today, coaches and colleges as well as a number of Olympians include chiropractic care as part of their training regiment. Chiropractors are considered part of the team. Chiropractic care is over 100 years and plays an important part in swimming and other sports.

All athletes, at one point or another, have suffered some kind of an injury, ranging from  a muscle pull, a sprain/strain injury, a repetitive stress injury or a major trauma. Sports and injury go hand in hand! So what can be done to treat sports injuries and what is the most appropriate type of care for treating these types of injuries? Most people who suffer sports related injuries try an over the counter medication (such as Tylenol, Motrin or Aleve). when that doesn’t work then they’ll go to their family doctor for something stronger. Unfortunately drugs only temporarily mask the symptoms, they do not cure sports related injuries. Instead consider a physical medicine approach, such as chiropractic care, to treating sports injuries. Physical medicine includes chiropractic adjustments coupled with a rehabilitation program (physical therapy) which is designed to improve functional range of motion, stabilize and strengthen the supportive soft tissues, foster balance and coordination and of course to get you out of pain as quickly as possible. Many professional athletes and 85% of all Olympic athletes rely on chiropractic care to enhance performance and to help them heal from injuries. The world’s best athletes, such as Tiger Woods, Emmitt Smith, Joe Montana, (decathlon gold medal winner) Dan O’Brien, Evander Holyfield, Lance Armstrong, etc.., have all used chiropractic care and it works for them.

A chiropractor can treat knee injuries, pack, injuries, rotator cuff injury, ankle injuries, and much more. Isn’t it time you consider chiropractic care, it will work for you too!

By: Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC
Mahler Family Chiropractic Center
1144 wyoming Ave.
Kingston, PA. 18704
http://mahler-chiropractic.com
May be reproduced in whole only.
We can treat sports injuries and pain  including neck pain, back pain, rotator cuff, foot pain, carpal tunnel, and much more.
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Shoulder Stretching Routine

Avoiding a rotator cuff injury

Front of the Shoulder Stretch: Pector Elongator

Shoulder stretching

Shoulder stretching

Maintaining open, fluid movement in the front of the shoulder during swimming will decrease compression in the joint. With biking and running, the shoulder tends to rotate inward and lift up toward the ear.

This same movement in swimming will add to tension and compression in the neck and shoulder. The pector elongator is a great stretch to use before or after a workout.

  1. Stand with your right hip about two or three feet away from a wall.
  2. Place your right hand on the wall at shoulder level, behind the torso. Keep your elbow loosely bent.
  3. Now rotate your elbow forward and maintain this forward rotation throughout the stretch.
  4. Twist your upper torso to the left, while retaining elbow rotation, to create a stretch in the front of the right shoulder.
  5. Hold the stretch for five to 12 breaths.
  6. Switch arms and repeat.

Variations can be created by moving your hand up and down the wall or by stepping farther away from the wall. Pector elongator is intense, so go easy. When you start to feel the stretch, stop and inhale deeply into the area being stretched.

Also, using a doorway will give you a perfect stretch at home or at the office. The hard part of this stretch is continuing to maintain a forward rotation of the elbow.

Deltoid/Rotator Cuff Stretch

Every shoulder problem seems to have rotator cuff involvement. These muscles are unique because they function as a ligament at the joint, and a muscle in locomotion. Located above the rotators are the deltoids, which can be stretched along with the rotators.

When an athlete has any type of shoulder problem, this is the first stretch I introduce. It’s ideal because it takes care of the muscle, the joint capsule and the range of motion.

  1. Stand facing the wall, approximately a foot away.
  2. Draw your right arm across your body.
  3. Place the back of your right hand on the wall at shoulder level.
  4. Move your left shoulder toward your right hand as far as you can, then lean the right shoulder toward the wall.
  5. To create a slightly different stretch, place the front of your hand on the wall.
  6. Hold the stretch for five to 12 breaths.
  7. Switch arms and repeat.

There’s room to be creative with this stretch. You can walk the hips away from the wall or experiment with your hand in different locations. To intensify the stretch, use the floor instead of the wall. The key is to move the shoulder that’s not being stretched down, and slowly lean the involved shoulder into the wall, floor or couch. (see step 4).

Side of the Torso Stretch: Lateral Bend

The side (lateral) muscles of the torso have a great deal of strength, power, endurance and elasticity. This natural elasticity adds power without increased mass. This stretch will allow you to be more effective in the reaching part of your swim stroke and have more power on the recovery part.

  1. Stand with your feet hip-distance apart, knees slightly bent.
  2. Expand your chest, lift your ribs and raise both hands over your head.
  3. On exhale, pull your abdomen back and lean to the right.
  4. Hold this position and inhale into the ribs.
  5. As you exhale, pull abdomen back and lean to the left, hold, inhale into the ribs.
  6. Repeat this side-to-side motion to the right and left four to six times.

Move from one side to the other on an exhale, allowing for a deep inhale into the ribs. This will increase both extension and strength. Keep the chest slightly in front of the hips and rotate the top of the pelvic girdle back—this will elongate the lower-back muscles and stretch the lats.

Lateral bend is a great stretch to use after a hard workout because of its effect on the lower back.

To concentrate the effects of flexibility training, your breath should be long and smooth, and your mind should be focused on the area you want to effect. Easy, extended breathing like this will improve both performance and recovery. Race and train forever.

A proper stretching routine will help avoid pain in the shoulder and rotator cuff injuries.

By: Paul R. Mahler Jr. DC
Mahler Family Chiropractic Center
1144 wyoming Ave.
Kingston, PA. 18704
http://mahler-chiropractic.com
May be reproduced in whole only.
We can treat rotator cuff injuries and pain.